Tuscaloosa Encore Athlete of the Month, Colin Taylor.

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Congratulations to the Tuscaloosa Encore Athlete of the Month, Colin Taylor! Colin is a Junior Football player at Hillcrest High School. He has played on the Patriots football team for 3 years now and wears jersey #70. During his three years on the team, he has on  the most improved offensive player of the year award. He is the son of Jamie and Bronwyn Taylor.

Foley Encore Athlete of the Month, Anna Langston.

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Congratulations to the Foley Encore Athlete of the Month, Anna Langston! Anna is a freshman multi-sport athlete at Foley High School. She has been a member of the Swimming and Soccer teams for a year now and will graduate in 2020. She is the daughter of Adam and Diesje Langston.

Alabama Squad Adds 2 Players to the All-Star Team via the AHSAA

 

MONTGOMERY – Alabama and Mississippi all-star teams reported Monday afternoon for Saturday’s 30th annual Alabama-Mississippi All-Star Football Game at Montgomery’s Cramton Bowl. Alabama’s squad added two players Monday with one replacement reporting Tuesday.
Kickoff is set for noon Saturday with Raycom Media televising the game live over its Raycom affiliate stations in both states as well as in Memphis and Columbus (GA). The AHSAA Radio Network will also broadcast the game live over its radio network Saturday.
Spain Park 6-foot-2, 275-pound defensive end Douglas Henze replaced LaBryan Ray of James Clemens. Henze reported Monday. Jaylond Adams of Minor, who was added last week, dropped off the team due Monday and was replaced by Opelika’s Craig Lawrence. The 6-foot-2, 240-pound Florence played fullback for the Class 6A state runner-up Bulldogs but will be likely used some at tight end as well.
St. Paul’s Episcopal defensive lineman Ryan Johnson is also expected to play some tight and for the Alabama squad this week.
UMS-Wright Coach Terry Curtis is serving as the Alabama head coach. Quarterbacking the squad will  Daulton Hyatt of Etowah and Bubba Thompson of McGill-Toolen Catholic with Blount’s multi-talented Kadarius Toney listed on the team as “athlete.” Toney, a Florida commit, combined for almost 4,000 total yards as the Leopards’ quarterback in 2016. Hyatt, heading to Arkansas, finished the 2016 121-of-184 passing for 2,240 yards and 25 touchdowns with only five interceptions.   Thompson led McGill-Toolen (13-1) to the 7A state finals – completing 26-of-39 passes for 280 yards in the 17-7 loss to Hoover. He finished 2016 with 211-of-387 passes completed for 2,984 yards and 38 touchdowns.
Head coach for Mississippi is Todd Mangum of Wayne County. 
Mississippi snapped a seven-game Alabama winning streak in the series last year with a 28-21 win at Hattiesburg (MS). Alabama holds a 21-8 edged in the series, however, dating back to 1988. The game was played in Mobile from 1988-2011 before moving to Cramton Bowl from 2011-15. The game was played at Southern Miss last year – the first time the game has been hosted in that state. Honorary captains include Kenny King for Alabama and Marcus DuPree for Mississippi.
   MISSISSIPPI SUPER RECRUIT: Among the top players on the Mississippi squad is 6-foot, 215-pound Clinton quarterback Cam Akers, who did not report with the team Monday but was expected to join the squad Monday night. He led Clinton to the MHSAA Class 6A state championship last weekend – finishing the season 173-of-280 passing for 3,128 yards and 31 touchdowns.
Clinton beat Pearl 49-35 to finish the season 14-1.  Also on the Mississippi squad from Clinton are running back Darius Maberry, a Southern Miss commitment, and defensive back Kam White, who has Iowa State at the top of his list.
West Point’s Everitt Cunningham, a 6-3, 240-pound defensive end, helped his team beat Laurel 29-8 to win the MHSAA Class 5A state crown.
TEAMS VISIT HYUNDAI PLANT: Both squads visited the Montgomery Hyundai automotive plant Monday night before settling in. The teams will conduct two practices Tuesday with the morning practice from 9 to 11 a.m., and the afternoon practice from 2 to 4 p.m.

Diamondhead Athlete of the Month, Brooke Fagan.

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Congratulations to the Diamondhead Athlete of the Month, Brooke Fagan! Brooke is a junior multi-sport athlete at Hancock High School in Kiln, MS. She has been a member of the Lady Hawks Softball and Volleyball teams for 5 years now and wears jersey #9 and #10 respectively. Brooke has quite a few impressive awards from her 5 year sports career- the 2015 South State MVP in volleyball and was a member of the 2015 All-State Volleyball team. She also has a 3.5 GPA and plans to play softball in college and major in sports medicine. She is the daughter of John and Jennifer Fagan.

The ultimate guide to keeping your diet during the holidays.

We know what you’re all thinking, keeping your diet during the most wonderful time of the year is not as easy as eating pumpkin pie. But we’ve done our research! The CDC and American Heart Association have come out with two awesome guidelines to help you keep up your diet through the holidays– And they are more simple than you think.

Let us start with a few pointers from the CDC shall we…

1. Holiday-Proof Your Plan by Planning Ahead

  • If your meal is served later than normal, eat a small snack at your usual mealtime and eat a little less when dinner is served.
  • Invited to a party? Bring a healthy dish along. Plenty of people will bring the sweets. (Be the change).
  • Don’t skip meals to save up for a feast. You’ll be really hungry and more likely to overeat (we’ve all done it, but you’ll be sorry about it later).

2. Outsmart the Buffet

When you face a spread of delicious holiday food, make healthy choices easier:

  • Make a small plate of the foods you like best. Portion control is everything.
  • Start with vegetables to take the edge off your appetite.
  • Eat slowly. It takes at least 20 minutes for your brain to realize you’re full.
  • Avoid or limit alcohol. If you do have an alcoholic drink, have it with food.

3. Fit in Favorites

Choose the dishes you really love and can’t get any other time of year, like Aunt Edna’s pumpkin pie (which has a lot less calories than pecan pie). Slow down and savor a small serving, and make sure to count it in your meal plan.

4. Gotta Keep Moving

You’ve got a lot on your plate this time of year (literally), and physical activity can get crowded out. But being active is your secret holiday weapon; it can help make up for eating more than usual and reduce stress during this most stressful time of year. Get moving with friends and family, such as taking a walk after a holiday meal. 

5. Get Your Zzz’s In

Going out more and staying out later often means cutting back on sleep. Sleep loss can make it harder to control your blood sugar, and when you’re sleep deprived you’ll tend to eat more and prefer high-fat, high-sugar food.  Aim for 7 hours per night to guard against mindless eating.

“Most of all, remember what the season is about—celebrating and connecting with the people you care about. When you focus more on the fun, it’s easier to focus less on the food.” 

See that wasn’t so bad! Now lets move along to what the American Heart Association has to say…

“This guide includes great tips and recipes to help you navigate the holiday season in a healthy way. Here are some simple ways you and your family can eat healthy. Visit heart.org/healthyeating to learn more.”

Include

• Fruits and vegetables • Whole grains • Beans and legumes • Nuts and seeds • Fish & skinless poultry, or plant-based alternatives • Fat-free and low-fat dairy products • Healthier fats and nontropical oils.

Limit

• Sodium and salt • Saturated fat • Sweets and added sugars, including sugar-sweetened beverages • Red meats — if you choose to eat red meat, select the leanest cuts.

Avoid

• Trans fat and partially hydrogenated oils

Tips

  • Choose wisely, even with healthier foods. Ingredients and nutrient content can vary by brand and preparation.
  • Compare nutrition information on package labels and select products with the lowest amounts of sodium, added sugars, saturated fat and trans fat, and no partially hydrogenated oils.
  • Watch your calorie intake. To maintain weight, consume only as many calories as you use up through physical activity. If you want to lose weight, consume fewer calories or burn more calories.
  • Eat reasonable portions. Often this is less than you are served.
  • Eat a wide variety of foods to get all the nutrients your body needs.
  • Prepare and eat healthier meals at home. You’ll have more control over ingredients.
  • Look for the Heart-Check mark to easily identify foods that can be part of an overall healthy diet. Learn more at heartcheck.org 

    **You can find delicious alternative recipes for family meals from the A.H.A. here.

 

Fayette Encore Athlete of the Month, Nick Holmes.

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Congratulations to the Fayette Encore Athlete of the Month, Nick Holmes! Nick is a sophomore athlete at Fayette County High School. He has played on the Varsity Tigers Football team for a year now and wears jersey #61. Nick was referred to our clinic after he broke his ankle during football season. He has received physical therapy for all little over a month now and has been progressing greatly.

Nick is the son of Amber Holmes. Keep up the good work, Nick!

CLASS 7A CHAMPIONSHIP GAME: Hoover 17, McGill-Toolen Catholic 7.

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    AUBURN – Hoover High School’s last defensive series of the Super 7 Class 7A state championship game Wednesday night  was perhaps the best series of the 2016 season.
Three straight sacks on second, third and fourth down left defending state champion McGill-Toolen Catholic (13-1) some 36 yards shy of a first down and closed the final chapter on the Bucs’ 17-7 victory and the 12th state title in school history.
The Super 7 Championships continue Thursday at Jordan-Hare Stadium with defending state champion Piedmont (14-0) facing Mobile Christian (13-1) in the 3A title game at 11 a.m., followed by defending state champion Maplesville (13-0) vs. Pickens County (11-3) in the 1A finals at 3 p.m. Beauregard (12-1) and Wenonah (11-2) close out Thursday’s schedule with the 5A finals at 7 p.m. All games are being televised live over the Raycom Media Network. Go towww.pathtotheplayoffs.com for more details. Tickets are also available at www.preptix.com.
Led by 2016 7A Championship Game MVP Kholbe Coleman, Hoover (12-2) finished the night with nine sacks and 82 lost yards for the Yellow Jackets’ talented offense.  Coleman finished with eight tackles, one sack for a 15-yard loss and 3.5 tackles resulting in 23 negative McGill-Toolen yards. Coach Caleb Ross’s Jackets finished with minus-43 yards rushing on the night.  Quarterback Bubba Thompson was 26-of-39 passing for 280 yards but finished with a negative 58 yards rushing on 16 carries.
The Hoover offense was solid – building a first-half 10-0 lead on junior place-kicker Barret Pickering’s 42-yard field goal late in the first quarter and C.J. Sturdivant’s 2-yard TD run midway through the second period.  The kick was the 19th field goal of the season for Pickering, a Hoover school record.
Sturdivant, who finished with a game-high 96 yards rushing on 16 carries, dashed 37 yards with 8:50 left in the third quarter for his second touchdown of the night to give Hoover a 17-0 lead.
McGill-Toolen clawed back, however. Thompson connected with Jalen Tolbert with 4:13 remaining for a 30-yard TD pass to cap a 10-play, 80-yard march. Tolbert finished with four catches for 60 yards.  Hoover got the onside kick, and then turned to its defense to seal the win.
Hoover defensive end Christon Taylor added three sacks and six tackles and Ben Abercrombie had nine stops. Jayden Jordan also had a key interception.
McGill-Toolen, which saw its 22-game winning streak come to an end, got a strong defensive effort Carlton Martial. The linebacker had 11 solo tackles and six assists for 17 total stops. Receiver Trey Roberson also had six catches for 78 yards, and Larry Rembert, five catches for 51 yards.
Hoover has won 10 state titles in the last 16 seasons.

“Recovery After Stroke: Coping with Emotions” via National Stroke Association.

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*The complete article can be found here.

Dealing with a flood of emotions can be hard for stroke survivors. Some emotions are normal responses to the changes in your life after stroke. Others are common but should not be considered a normal part of stroke recovery. If you suffer from depression, anxiety or emotions that are not in line with the occasion, seek help.

Dealing with Depression

Grieving for what you have lost is good for you. But when sadness turns to depression, it’s time to act. Depression can take hold right after a stroke, during rehabilitation (rehab) or after you go home. It can be – but not always – caused by brain damage from the stroke. Mild or major, it is the most common emotional problem faced by survivors.

Your treatment may include counseling, medicine or both.

Depression symptoms include:

  •  Feeling sad or “empty” most of the time
  •  Loss of interest or pleasure in ordinary activities
  •  Fatigue or feeling “slowed down”
  •  Sudden trouble sleeping or oversleeping
  •  Sudden loss of appetite or weight gain
  •  Being unable to concentrate, remember or make decisions like you used to
  •  Feeling worthless or helpless
  •  Feelings of guilt
  •  Ongoing thoughts of death or suicide, suicide planning or attempts
  • A sudden change in how easily you are annoyed  Crying all the time

    Some useful tips:

     Make the most of rehab; the more you recover, the better you will feel

    Spend time with family and friends

     Maintain your quality of life by staying active and doing things you enjoy

     Seek help soon after you note symptom

Having Extreme Anxiety

Anxiety is an overwhelming sense of worry or fear. It can include increased sweating or heart rate. Among stroke survivors, feelings of anxiety are common. Often, stroke survivors suffer from both depression and anxiety at the same time.

Anxiety can affect rehab progress, daily living, relationships and quality of life. So, be sure to seek help right away.

Anxiety symptoms include:

  •   Ongoing worrying, fear, restlessness and irritability that don’t seem to let up
  •   Low energy
  •   Poor concentration
  •   Muscle tension
  •   Feeling panicky and out of breath
  •   Scary rapid heart beat
  •   Shaking
  •   Headache
  •   Feeling sick to your stomach

    Again, treatment may include counseling, medicine or both.

Uncontrolled Emotions

Do you find yourself laughing or crying at all the wrong times? If so, you may suffer from Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA). Also called emotional incontinence or pathologic lability, PBA is a common medical problem among stroke survivors. It can cause you to laugh at a funeral or cry at a comedy club. It can even make you cry uncontrollably for little or no reason. For this, it is often confused with depression. But, PBA is not depression.

People with PBA are unable to control their emotional expressions the way they used to. When this happens in social settings, they feel embarrassed, frustrated and angry. They also sense that others are uneasy. They may avoid work, public places and family get-togethers. This can lead to feelings of fear, shame and isolation.

There is no treatment approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for PBA, though antidepressant drugs can help.

These things may help you cope with PBA:

  •  Be open about it. Warn people that you cannot always control your emotions.
  • Explain that the emotions you show on the outside don’t always reflect how you feel on the inside.
  •  Distract yourself. If you feel an outburst coming on, focus on something boring or unrelated. Try counting the number of items on a shelf.
  •   Note the posture you take when crying. When you think you are about to cry, change your posture.
  •   Breathe in and out slowly until you are in control.
  •   Relax your forehead, shoulders and other muscles that tense up when crying.

    What Can Help

  •   Ask your doctor about emotional changes and symptoms early on.
  •   Ask your family to stimulate your interest in people and social activities.
  •   Stay as active as possible and stay involved in your hobbies.
  •   Set goals and measure accomplishment.
  •   Plan daily activities to provide structure and sense of purpose.
  • Stay involved with people, thoughts and activities that you enjoy.

    Get information on stroke recovery from National Stroke Association. Visit http://www.stroke.org or call 1- 800-STROKES (1-800-787- 6537).

    Contact your local stroke association. Join a stroke support group. Other survivors will understand your issues, and offer support and ideas to help you manage your emotions.

     

    Speak openly and honestly to your caregivers about your emotional changes. They’ll be glad you did, and together you can work out a solution.

     

    Professionals Help:

     Psychologists, psychiatrists and other mental health professionals experienced with stroke-related emotional disorders.

     

    Rehabilitation is a lifetime commitment and an important part of recovering from a stroke. Through rehabilitation, you relearn basic skills such as talking, eating, dressing and walking. Rehabilitation can also improve your strength, flexibility and endurance. The goal is to regain as much independence as possible.

    Remember to ask your doctor, “Where am I on my stroke recovery journey?

Alabama All-Star Team Adds 2 players

MONTGOMERY – Jackson-Olin High School senior linebacker T.D. Moultry and Minor receiver Jaylond Adams have been added to the Alabama All-Star Team roster for the 30th annual Alabama-Mississippi All-Star football game.
Alabama and Mississippi will square off Saturday, Dec. 10 at Cramton Bowl. Kickoff is set for noon with the game set to be televised live over the Raycom Network over its network in Alabama and Mississippi.
The 6-foot-3, 225-pound Moultry, an Auburn commitment, led Jackson-Olin to the Class 6A state playoffs in 2016 averaging more than 10 tackles per game. He had 13 stops and two sacks in the final regular season game versus Fairfield.  He has also been selected to play in the U.S. Army All-America Game in San Antonio, Texas, Jan. 7. He replaces Central-Phenix City’s Markail Benton.
Adams was a standout running back, wide receiver and kick returner while leading Minor (11-2) to the Class 6A, Region 6 championship and its best season since 2000.  The Tigers scored a school record 631 points.
Adams had over 1,500 yards rushing and went over 2,000 yards including receiving and kick returns.  He replaced Zech Byrd of Stanhope Elmore.
UMS-Wright Coach Terry Curtis is serving as head coach for this year’s game. Alabama holds a 21-8 edge in the series. Mississippi won last year 28-21 at Hattiesburg, MS. It was the first time the game had been played outside Alabama and snapped a seven-game winning streak for the Alabama All-Stars.