parents

The ultimate guide to keeping your diet during the holidays.

We know what you’re all thinking, keeping your diet during the most wonderful time of the year is not as easy as eating pumpkin pie. But we’ve done our research! The CDC and American Heart Association have come out with two awesome guidelines to help you keep up your diet through the holidays– And they are more simple than you think.

Let us start with a few pointers from the CDC shall we…

1. Holiday-Proof Your Plan by Planning Ahead

  • If your meal is served later than normal, eat a small snack at your usual mealtime and eat a little less when dinner is served.
  • Invited to a party? Bring a healthy dish along. Plenty of people will bring the sweets. (Be the change).
  • Don’t skip meals to save up for a feast. You’ll be really hungry and more likely to overeat (we’ve all done it, but you’ll be sorry about it later).

2. Outsmart the Buffet

When you face a spread of delicious holiday food, make healthy choices easier:

  • Make a small plate of the foods you like best. Portion control is everything.
  • Start with vegetables to take the edge off your appetite.
  • Eat slowly. It takes at least 20 minutes for your brain to realize you’re full.
  • Avoid or limit alcohol. If you do have an alcoholic drink, have it with food.

3. Fit in Favorites

Choose the dishes you really love and can’t get any other time of year, like Aunt Edna’s pumpkin pie (which has a lot less calories than pecan pie). Slow down and savor a small serving, and make sure to count it in your meal plan.

4. Gotta Keep Moving

You’ve got a lot on your plate this time of year (literally), and physical activity can get crowded out. But being active is your secret holiday weapon; it can help make up for eating more than usual and reduce stress during this most stressful time of year. Get moving with friends and family, such as taking a walk after a holiday meal. 

5. Get Your Zzz’s In

Going out more and staying out later often means cutting back on sleep. Sleep loss can make it harder to control your blood sugar, and when you’re sleep deprived you’ll tend to eat more and prefer high-fat, high-sugar food.  Aim for 7 hours per night to guard against mindless eating.

“Most of all, remember what the season is about—celebrating and connecting with the people you care about. When you focus more on the fun, it’s easier to focus less on the food.” 

See that wasn’t so bad! Now lets move along to what the American Heart Association has to say…

“This guide includes great tips and recipes to help you navigate the holiday season in a healthy way. Here are some simple ways you and your family can eat healthy. Visit heart.org/healthyeating to learn more.”

Include

• Fruits and vegetables • Whole grains • Beans and legumes • Nuts and seeds • Fish & skinless poultry, or plant-based alternatives • Fat-free and low-fat dairy products • Healthier fats and nontropical oils.

Limit

• Sodium and salt • Saturated fat • Sweets and added sugars, including sugar-sweetened beverages • Red meats — if you choose to eat red meat, select the leanest cuts.

Avoid

• Trans fat and partially hydrogenated oils

Tips

  • Choose wisely, even with healthier foods. Ingredients and nutrient content can vary by brand and preparation.
  • Compare nutrition information on package labels and select products with the lowest amounts of sodium, added sugars, saturated fat and trans fat, and no partially hydrogenated oils.
  • Watch your calorie intake. To maintain weight, consume only as many calories as you use up through physical activity. If you want to lose weight, consume fewer calories or burn more calories.
  • Eat reasonable portions. Often this is less than you are served.
  • Eat a wide variety of foods to get all the nutrients your body needs.
  • Prepare and eat healthier meals at home. You’ll have more control over ingredients.
  • Look for the Heart-Check mark to easily identify foods that can be part of an overall healthy diet. Learn more at heartcheck.org 

    **You can find delicious alternative recipes for family meals from the A.H.A. here.

 

Advertisements

“3 Defending Champions Survive 3rd Round Of AHSAA State Football Playoffs”

cwedryuweaiayn0

     MONTGOMERY – Three defending state champions and nine undefeated teams emerged from the third round of the AHSAA State Football Playoffs Friday night.

This week’s slate includes 12 semifinal games. All winners will advance to the Super 7 State championships at Auburn Nov. 30-Dec.1-2.
Unbeaten teams by class in the playoffs include: (Class 1A) Maplesville (12-0); Linden (13-0), Addison (13-0); (Class 2A) G.W. Long (12-0); Fyffe (13-0); (Class 3A) Gordo (13-0); Piedmont (13-0); (Class 6A) Park Crossing (13-0); (Class 7A) McGill-Toolen Catholic (13-0).
Advancing to the next round are 20 region champions, four region second seeds, one third seed and one fourth seed.

All seminal pairings and quarterfinal results are listed.

AHSAA STATE FOOTBALL PLAYOFFS
Semifinal Pairings
(All games, Friday, Nov. 25, 7 p.m.)

CLASS 1A
Maplesville (12-0) at Linden (13-0)
Addison (13-0) at Pickens County (10-3), Reform

CLASS 2A
Aliceville (12-1) at G.W. Long (12-0), Skipperville
Fyffe (13-0) at Lanett (11-2)

CLASS 3A
Gordo (13-0) at Mobile Christian (12-1)
Ohatchee (12-1) at Piedmont (13-0)

CLASS 4A
Handley (11-2) at Andalusia (12-1)
Madison Academy (10-3) at Hokes Bluff (9-4)

CLASS 5A
Beauregard (11-1) at Jackson (9-3)
Wenonah (10-2) at Briarwood Christian (12-1)

CLASS 6A
Park Crossing (12-0) at Opelika (12-1)
Austin (10-3) at Ramsay (11-2), Birmingham

CLASS 7A
(Finals, Nov. 30, Jordan-Hare Stadium, Auburn)
McGill-Toolen Catholic (13-0) vs. Hoover (11-2), Nov. 30, 7 p.m.

 

Pediatric Physical Therapy: Specialized Services and Treatments for Children Under 18.

Screen Shot 2016-11-17 at 10.39.16 AM.png

“Doctors often recommend Pediatric Physical Therapy for children and teens who have been injured or who have movement problems from an illness, disease, or disability. Physical therapists work to decrease pain and help the child return to their daily activities. They also teach children exercises designed to help them regain strength and range of motion, and also show them and families how to prevent future injuries.” (Kids Health,  June 2014).

Doctors will often recommend PT for children with:

    • Cerebral Palsy
    • Spinal Cord Injuries
    • Traumatic Brain Injuries
    • Spina Bifida
    • Brachial Plexopathy
    • Pediatric Cancer
    • Socialization Skills
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • Developmental Delay
    • Down Syndrome
    • Feeding Problems
    • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
    • Gait Abnormalities
    • Hydrocephalus Muscular Dystrophy
    • Pediatric Medical Syndromes
    • Pediatric Neurologic Disorders
    • Premature Birth
    • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    • Seizure Disorders
    • Sensory Processing Difficulty
    • Torticollis/Plagiocephaly
    • Vision/Hearing Deficits
    • Sports Injuries

Advanced Specialization Training

  • Astronaut Training Protocol
  • Beckman Oral Motor Program
  • Contemporary Neurodevelopmental Treatment
  • Sequential-Oral-Sensory Approach to Feeding Program
  • Comprehensive Program in Sensory Integration including Administration of Sensory Integration & Praxis Test (SIPT)
  • VitalStim

What Pediatric Physical Therapists Do

At our two Pediatric Therapy Clinics located in Ocean Springs and Pascagoula MS, our therapists use a variety of treatments to help build strength, improve movement, and strengthen skills needed to complete daily activities.

Physical Therapy

  • Gross Motor Development/ Conditioning Activities
  • Neuromuscular Retraining Aquatic Therapy
  • Movement Skills/ Function
  • Balance/ Gait Training
  • Coordination Skills
  • Standardized Testing of Motor Abilities
  • Assistance with Positioning & Mobility Equipment
  • Orthotic Recommendations
  • Power Wheelchair Assessment & Training

Speech-Language Therapy

  • Language Therapy
  • Articulation Therapy
  • Dysphagia Therapy
  • Oral Motor Therapy
  • Assistive Technology
  • Fluency and Voice Therapy

Occupational Therapy

  • Handwriting & Fine Motor Skill Training
  • Assistance with Activities of Daily Living
  • Sensory Integration Therapy
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Custom Splinting for Neurologic Conditions
  • Cognitive Retraining
  • Constraint Casting & Treatment
  • Neuromuscular Retraining
  • Training with Adaptive Equipment
  • Standardized Testing of Motor Abilities

Two of our Locations that offer all of the specialized Pediatric Therapy Treatments and Services are located below:

Ocean Springs Pediatric Rehab

#2 Doctor’s Drive  Ocean Springs, MS 39564

Phone: (228) 818-1211  •  Fax: (228) 818-1213

Pascagoula Medical Park

3101 Denny Ave, Suite 120,  Pascagoula, MS 39568

Phone: (228) 471-1520  •  Fax: (228) 471-1525

Encore Rehabilitation of Cullman

1701 Main Ave SW  Cullman, AL 35055
Phone: (256) 775-3737

“How do I know if I have a Concussion?” – Signs and Symptoms of concussions in adults and children.

At the ATC conventions many of the topics are around concussions; “how do you properly diagnose an athlete with a concussion?” “What are the signs and symptoms?” We wanted to help inform athletes, parents, and coaches on what exactly a concussion entails and what to do if you think you have one. Below are two lists, one for adults and one for children, that will help you be able to recognize the signs of a concussion.  If you have signs of a concussion, please see a doctor immediately for further instruction and proper procedures. 

*These two lists can be found at WebMD.com and MayoClinic.org.

“It is not always easy to know if someone has a concussion. You don’t have to pass out (lose consciousness) to have a concussion. Symptoms of a concussion range from mild to severe and can last for hours, days, weeks, or even months. If you notice any symptoms of a concussion, contact your doctor.” – WebMD

Symptoms of a concussion fit into four main categories:

  • Thinking and remembering
    • Not thinking clearly
    • Temporary loss of consciousness
    • Feeling slowed down
    • Not being able to concentrate
    • Not being able to remember new information
    • Delayed response to questions*
    • Slurred speech*
  • Physical
    • Headache or feeling of pressure of the head
    • Fuzzy or blurry vision
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Dizziness
    • Ringing in the ears
    • Sensitivity to light or noise
    • Balance problems
    • Feeling tired or having no energy
  • Emotional and mood
    • Easily upset or angered
    • Sad
    • Nervous or anxious
    • More emotional
  • Sleep
    • Sleeping more than usual
    • Sleeping less than usual
    • Having a hard time falling asleep

Symptoms in Young children:

  • Crying more than usual.
  • Headache that does not go away.
  • Changes in the way they play or act.
  • Changes in the way they nurse, eat, or sleep.
  • Being upset easily or having more temper tantrums.
  • A sad mood.
  • Appearing dazed
  • Lack of interest in their usual activities or favorite toys.
  • Loss of new skills, such as toilet training.
  • Loss of balance and trouble walking.
  • Not being able to pay attention.

Sources:

 “Concussion – Overview.” . Healthwise, Incorporated, 29 Nov. 2011. Web. 25 June 2014. <http://www.webmd.com/brain/tc/traumatic-brain-injury-concussion-overview&gt;.

Mayo Clinic Staff. “Concussion Symptoms.” . N.p., 2 Apr. 2014. Web. 25 June 2014. <http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/concussion/basics/symptoms/con-20019272&gt;.