Physical Therapy

Fayette Encore Patient of the Month, Sherman Lee.

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We would like to recognize our Fayette Encore Patient of the Month, Sherman Lee. Sherman is a native of Fayette, AL and has been coming to our clinic to receive physical therapy after his total knee replacement. He has been receiving therapy treatment for 2 months now and has been improving greatly! Keep up the good work Mr. Lee!

“I have been to Encore before at the Winfield location. This is a great bunch of professionals and I love the way they treat their patients. I want to stay with Encore.”

-Mr. Lee.

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“The Link Between Nutrition and Pain Is too Strong to Ignore” via APTA.

By Joe Tatta, PT, DPT, via APTA

Here’s a situation I bet you see all too often in your practice: a patient or client comes to you to overcome pain and increase mobility, and you see almost immediately that working on the mechanics of motion won’t be enough—they could really benefit from some lifestyle changes as well. Frequently, one of those changes involves thinking more carefully about the food they’re putting into their bodies.

Despite Hippocrates’ oft-quoted “Let food be thy medicine,” most physicians receive only a few hours of instruction about nutrition and coaching to help patients change their eating habits. Yet studies like this one from the National Institutes of Health show nutritional education becomes an incredibly useful tool to improve overall health outcomes for patients and specifically reduce inflammation.

As PTs, we are presented with a real opportunity here. Research shows that PTs can play an active role in lifestyle-related interventions such as nutrition. Providing information on nutrition will put you ahead of the curve with your peers while improving your patients’ results.

Early in my practice, I saw how obesity often contributed to my patients’ pain. Once I began providing information on some simple diet and lifestyle strategies with my patients, many lost weight, felt better, and dramatically reduced their pain. Nutrition became the missing link to help my patients manage and relieve pain.

Over time, I’ve found that nutritional screening and informational strategies can make a difference in 5 conditions associated with pain that we often see in our practices:

  1. Inflammation. Copious inflammatory foods, including vegetable oils, populate the Western diet. Most observational and interventional studies show a traditional Mediterranean diet, rich in healthy fatty acids, fruits, vegetables and fiber, provides anti-inflammatory benefits. Among specific conditions, studies show a Mediterranean diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants provide anti-inflammatory effects that benefit individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. Epidemiologic and clinical evidence likewise shows an optimal diet can reduce inflammation that, among other things, contributes to metabolic syndrome.
  2. Obesity. As we all know, a vicious cycle ensues as obesity contributes to numerous chronic pain conditions, and the pain in turn can lead to sedentary behavior that increases obesity. Studies prove what I’ve seen countless times in my own practice: weight loss must become a crucial aspect of overall pain rehabilitation.
  3. Osteoarthritis (OA). Studies have shown a relationship between pain and food intake among overweight and obese patients with OA. Fortunately, obesity is the most modifiable risk factor for knee OA. Of course, pain management is crucial to reducing OA symptoms. But even that may have a nutrition connection: one systematic review found scientific evidence to support some specific nutritional interventions–including omega 3 fatty acids–to relieve symptoms among patients with OA. Studies also show various nutrient deficiencies, including vitamins C and D as well as selenium, contribute to OA.
  4. Autoimmune disease. NIH estimates that 23.5 million Americans have an autoimmune disease (compare that with cancer, which affects 13 million Americans). Over 80 autoimmune disorders exist, including Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Of course, genetic predisposition, environmental factors (including infections), and gut dysbiosis play major roles in autoimmune disease development. But increasingly, researchers believe adverse dietary changes over the past 50 years–including gluten intolerances, altered gut bacteria, and vitamin D deficiencies–also contribute to that increased rate of autoimmune diseases. Chief among those changes is our prevalent high-sugar, high-salt, processed-food heavy diet that paves the pathway for autoimmune diseases. Nutrient-poor diets only exacerbate that problem: evidence shows vitamin D, vitamin A, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, and flavanol deficiencies contribute to autoimmune diseases.
  5. Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes affects 29.1 million Americans (that’s over 9% of the population) and paves the way for serious complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. Diabetic neuropathic pain, a common diabetes complication and the most common form of neuropathic pain, affects over 90% of people with diabetes. Studies show increased musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes adversely impacts body mass index, quality of life, physical function, and physical activity abilities. The link between diabetes and nutrition is a fundamental one that should never be set aside.

Working with patients suffering these and other conditions, I’m often impressed how optimal nutrition becomes the needle-mover to alleviate pain and help people heal. So how can a PT incorporate these considerations into practice? Here are a few simple tactics you can use right now:

  1. Ask nutrition-related questions during your initial consultation. Simple things like “do you take a multivitamin” or “about how many vegetable servings do you eat a week” can help lead to gradual dietary tweaks that yield impressive results.
  2. Have your patients keep a 24-hour food diary. Beyond establishing adherence and accountability, asking patients to write down everything they eat for 24 hours provides insight to their daily eating habits. Once you have that insight, you can help them gradually improve those habits.
  3. Offer some simple information. Rather than impose a major dietary overhaul, ask patients to do things that don’t seem so overwhelming; for example, to increase their water intake, or eliminate processed foods and sugar.
  4. Create simple, attainable goals. Begin by allowing your patients to experience success in some way. You might ask a patient to lose 5 pounds over 3 weeks, or provide information about incorporating more omega-3 fats into their diet combined with their exercise program. These goals are doable, and they can provide your patient with the confidence to take on more challenging targets.
  5. Offer your patients other ways to access information on better nutrition. Providing your patients with collateral sources of information—a helpful blog post, or an engaging book on nutrition—helps to reinforce the idea that the benefits of what they’re doing are well-established, and that they’re not alone in their journey toward healthier living. During a subsequent visit, ask patients if they got anything out of what you shared. The more reliable, readable information they receive, the better the chances that they’ll begin to become genuinely interested in the topic themselves, and for the long run. Over time, I’ve even had a few patients recommend books and blogs to me. Refer patients to nutrition and dietary professionals when their needs exceed the professional scope and your personal scope of practice.

If you’ve incorporated nutritional screening and information into your practice, what did you find was the most challenging aspect? Did you see results when patients made those changes? Share your thoughts below.

Joe Tatta, PT, DPT, is a board-certified nutrition specialist and functional medicine practitioner who specializes in treating lifestyle-related musculoskeletal, metabolic, and autoimmune health issues. He is the creator of the Healing Pain Online Summit and The Healing Pain Podcast, and is the author of Heal Your Pain Now: A revolutionary program to reset your brain and body for a pain-free life by Da Capo Press. Learn more by visiting www.drjoetatta.com/apta.

Pediatric Physical Therapy: Specialized Services and Treatments for Children Under 18.

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“Doctors often recommend Pediatric Physical Therapy for children and teens who have been injured or who have movement problems from an illness, disease, or disability. Physical therapists work to decrease pain and help the child return to their daily activities. They also teach children exercises designed to help them regain strength and range of motion, and also show them and families how to prevent future injuries.” (Kids Health,  June 2014).

Doctors will often recommend PT for children with:

    • Cerebral Palsy
    • Spinal Cord Injuries
    • Traumatic Brain Injuries
    • Spina Bifida
    • Brachial Plexopathy
    • Pediatric Cancer
    • Socialization Skills
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • Developmental Delay
    • Down Syndrome
    • Feeding Problems
    • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
    • Gait Abnormalities
    • Hydrocephalus Muscular Dystrophy
    • Pediatric Medical Syndromes
    • Pediatric Neurologic Disorders
    • Premature Birth
    • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    • Seizure Disorders
    • Sensory Processing Difficulty
    • Torticollis/Plagiocephaly
    • Vision/Hearing Deficits
    • Sports Injuries

Advanced Specialization Training

  • Astronaut Training Protocol
  • Beckman Oral Motor Program
  • Contemporary Neurodevelopmental Treatment
  • Sequential-Oral-Sensory Approach to Feeding Program
  • Comprehensive Program in Sensory Integration including Administration of Sensory Integration & Praxis Test (SIPT)
  • VitalStim

What Pediatric Physical Therapists Do

At our two Pediatric Therapy Clinics located in Ocean Springs and Pascagoula MS, our therapists use a variety of treatments to help build strength, improve movement, and strengthen skills needed to complete daily activities.

Physical Therapy

  • Gross Motor Development/ Conditioning Activities
  • Neuromuscular Retraining Aquatic Therapy
  • Movement Skills/ Function
  • Balance/ Gait Training
  • Coordination Skills
  • Standardized Testing of Motor Abilities
  • Assistance with Positioning & Mobility Equipment
  • Orthotic Recommendations
  • Power Wheelchair Assessment & Training

Speech-Language Therapy

  • Language Therapy
  • Articulation Therapy
  • Dysphagia Therapy
  • Oral Motor Therapy
  • Assistive Technology
  • Fluency and Voice Therapy

Occupational Therapy

  • Handwriting & Fine Motor Skill Training
  • Assistance with Activities of Daily Living
  • Sensory Integration Therapy
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Custom Splinting for Neurologic Conditions
  • Cognitive Retraining
  • Constraint Casting & Treatment
  • Neuromuscular Retraining
  • Training with Adaptive Equipment
  • Standardized Testing of Motor Abilities

Two of our Locations that offer all of the specialized Pediatric Therapy Treatments and Services are located below:

Ocean Springs Pediatric Rehab

#2 Doctor’s Drive  Ocean Springs, MS 39564

Phone: (228) 818-1211  •  Fax: (228) 818-1213

Pascagoula Medical Park

3101 Denny Ave, Suite 120,  Pascagoula, MS 39568

Phone: (228) 471-1520  •  Fax: (228) 471-1525

Encore Rehabilitation of Cullman

1701 Main Ave SW  Cullman, AL 35055
Phone: (256) 775-3737

5 Tips to Avoid Chronic Pain

1. Know Pain, Know Gain. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that understanding how our pain systems work is an excellent strategy in managing it. The great news is that you don’t need to know a lot! Simply knowing the basics of how our brain and nerves work, and their role in pain, can help reduce your chance for developing chronic symptoms. Learn more.

2. Keep moving. Gradually and steadily. Living an active, healthy lifestyle not only improves our general well-being and health, but can also reduce our chances of developing chronic pain. Our body was built to move, and we need to understand that not all aches or soreness is cause for concern. Learn more.

3. Spend time with a good PT. If you experience an injury, or develop the onset of pain, seeing a physical therapist (PT) early on can help address and manage your symptoms. PTs are movement experts who can diagnose and treat injuries and help you identify strategies to better manage your pain. The earlier you seek care, the better the chances you have for not developing chronic symptoms. And there’s no reason to wait: you can see a physical therapist without a physician’s referral in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Learn more.

4. Don’t focus on an image. While most of us want a diagnostic image (ie, x-ray, MRI) to tell us “why we hurt,” images actually give us little information about what’s causing pain. A study performed on individuals 60 years or older, who had no symptoms of low back pain, found that more than 90% had a degenerated or bulging disc, 36% had a herniated disc, and 21% had spinal stenosis. What shows up on an image may or may not be related to your symptoms. Once imaging has cleared you of a serious condition, your physical therapist will help guide you back to the life you want to live!

5. Addressing depression and anxiety helps. Your chances of developing chronic pain may be higher if you also are experiencing depression and anxiety. A recent study in the Journal of Pain showed that depression, as well as some of our thoughts about pain prior to total knee replacement, was related to long-term pain following the procedure. Make sure that you talk to your medical provider about your mental health throughout your treatment; it can help make your journey go much more smoothly following an injury or surgery.

The c launched a national campaign to raise awareness about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for long-term pain management. Learn more at our #ChoosePT page.

Authored by Joseph Brence, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, COMT, DAC

*Complete Article can be found here.

Physical Therapy: A Good First Choice Before Surgery for Meniscal Tears and Knee Osteoarthritis

“Mild meniscal tears and moderate knee osteoarthritis send some people under the knife, when all they really need is physical therapy.

recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine found no significant difference between individuals who received surgery and those who received physical therapy alone, thus avoiding the unnecessarily invasive procedure and related costs.

Dr Edward Laskowski, codirector of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, told Men’s Journal that physical therapy might prove equally effective for other knee injuries, including MCL, PCL, and cartilage tears (Try Physical Therapy Before Surgery – April 29, 2013).

“If you have good range of motion, physical therapy may very well settle down the symptoms over time,” Laskowski said.

Learn about physical therapist treatment of meniscal tears and osteoarthritis of the knee.”

Related Resources:

This article was found at http://www.moveforwardpt.com/DidYouKnow/Detail.aspx?cid=687aa921-ed48-46dd-9b2f-17febb9423ed.

National Physical Therapy Month- #ChoosePT

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October is National Physical Therapy Month and we want to recognize, and thank, all the Physical Therapists that work for our company! We are proud to be the largest privately owned provider of physical therapy throughout Alabama and Mississippi and we love to see our patients succeed through their therapy treatments.

As we recognize all of our wonderful therapists during National Physical Therapy Month, we also want to promote the #ChoosePT campaign. APTA has launched this awareness campaign about the growing toll of the opioid epidemic and has also provided the safety and effectiveness of physical therapy for pain management.

Physical therapy has been identified as a safe and effective alternative to opioids for long-term pain management and prevention by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Surgeon General. Physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) have a responsibility to understand the full scope of the epidemic and its potential impact on their patients and clients.”

No one wants to live in pain- and we don’t want you to. Choose Physical Therapy for Safe Pain Management.  Don’t just mask the pain. Treat it!

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Our therapists from the Ocean Springs Neurological Vestibular Rehabilitation Clinic in Mississippi are actively involved with the #ChoosePT movement and want to encourage you to be a part too. #SayNoToOpioids
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Fairhope Encore Athlete of the Month, Jaylen Mass.

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Jaylen Mass

Congratulations to the Fairhope Encore Athlete of the Month, Jaylen Mass! Jaylen is a Junior athlete at Fairhope High School in Alabama. He is a Wide Receiver on the Pirates Varsity Football team and wears jersey #16. Jaylen has been on of our patients for 2 months now and has been receiving physical therapy after having ACL reconstruction surgery. He has been quickly recovering and will be back on the football field in no time. We’re proud of you Jaylen! Keep up the good work!

9 Things You Should Know About Pain

1. Pain is output from the brain. While we used to believe that pain originated within the tissues of our body, we now understand that pain does not exist until the brain determines it does. The brain uses a virtual “road map” to direct an output of pain to tissues that it suspects may be in danger. This process acts as a means of communication between the brain and the tissues of the body, to serve as a defense against possible injury or disease.

2. The degree of injury does not always equal the degree of pain. Research has demonstrated that we all experience pain in individual ways. While some of us experience major injuries with little pain, others experience minor injuries with a lot of pain (think of a paper cut).

3. Despite what diagnostic imaging (MRIs, x-rays, CT scans) shows us, the finding may not be the cause of your pain. A study performed on individuals 60 years or older who had no symptoms of low back pain found that 36% had a herniated disc, 21% had spinal stenosis, and more than 90% had a degenerated or bulging disc, upon diagnostic imaging.

4. Psychological factors, such as depression and anxiety, can make your pain worse. Pain can be influenced by many different factors, such as psychological conditions. A recent study in the Journal of Pain showed that psychological variables that existed prior to a total knee replacement were related to a patient’s experience of long-term pain following the operation.

5. Your social environment may influence your perception of pain. Many patients state their pain increases when they are at work or in a stressful situation. Pain messages can be generated when an individual is in an environment or situation that the brain interprets as unsafe. It is a fundamental form of self-protection.

6. Understanding pain through education may reduce your need for care. A large study conducted with military personnel demonstrated that those who were given a 45-minute educational session about pain sought care for low back pain less than their counterparts.

7. Our brains can be tricked into developing pain in prosthetic limbs. Studies have shown that our brains can be tricked into developing a “referred” sensation in a limb that has been amputated, causing a feeling of pain that seems to come from the prosthetic limb – or from the “phantom” limb. The sensation is generated by the association of the brain’s perception of what the body is from birth (whole and complete) and what it currently is (post-amputation).

8. The ability to determine left from right may be altered when you experience pain. Networks within the brain that assist you in determining left from right can be affected when you experience severe pain. If you have been experiencing pain, and have noticed your sense of direction is a bit off, it may be because a “roadmap” within the brain that details a path to each part of the body may be a bit “smudged.” (This is a term we use to describe a part of the brain’s virtual roadmap that isn’t clear. Imagine spilling ink onto part of a roadmap and then trying to use that map to get to your destination.)

9. There is no way of knowing whether you have a high tolerance for pain or not. Science has yet to determine whether we all experience pain in the same way. While some people claim to have a “high tolerance” for pain, there is no accurate way to measure or compare pain tolerance among individuals. While some tools exist to measure how much force you can resist before experiencing pain, it can’t be determined what your pain “feels like.”

Read more about Pain and Chronic Pain Syndromes.

The American Physical Therapy Association launched a national campaign to raise awareness about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for long-term pain management. Learn more at our #ChoosePT page.

Author: Joseph Brence, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, COMT, DAC

**Article found at: http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail/9-things-you-should-know-about-pain

Winfield Encore Athlete of the Month, Caleb Wilson.

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Congratulations to the Winfield Encore Athlete of the Month, Caleb Wilson! Caleb is a Junior at Winfield City High School and is a member of the Football and Track teams. He has played on the Varsity teams for 3 years now and wears jersey #53. After he graduates from high school, Caleb plans to attend Auburn University and major in Physical Therapy. He is the son of Janice Nichols.

“6 Advantages of Encore Rehabilitation,” written by Andrew Stark from GuideDoc.

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Thanks for writting/rating our company Andrew! Here is his article below.

Encore Rehabilitation Services: An Overview of Encore Rehabilitation Benefits

Encore Rehabilitation is a leading provider of physical therapy and rehabilitation services, featuring dozens of locations in Mississippi and Alabama. The facility employs numerous professionals trained in medicine and physical therapy, providing the utmost standard of care for its patients. If you are in the process of recovering from an injury, there are plenty of advantages to seeking treatment through one of Encore’s locations. This guide will weigh the pros and cons of this treatment facility to help you make an informed decision about your medical care and recovery.

Advantage #1: Specialized Care

The first major advantage to seeking care through Encore Rehabilitation is that they have a variety of professionals with expertise in specific fields. From pain management and sports medicine to women’s health and work rehabilitation, you will find a medical professional who has plenty of experience with your specific reason for seeking treatment. Specificity is crucial to a good recovery since specialized therapists have up-to-date training in all the latest technologies and methods within their specialty. You can rest assured that you will receive the highest quality of care and attention from staff members who take pride in working with the problems you have and helping you reach your recovery goals. Patients have the option to work with professionals in one or more specialties, making Encore Rehabilitation a one-stop shop for physical wellness.

Advantage #2: Varied Services

In addition to basic physical therapy services, Encore also offers a variety of services to help the community. Speech-language pathology, or speech therapy, is provided at local schools so students don’t have to travel to receive services. This type of convenient care is crucial to making rehabilitation accessible to everyone. Even if you can’t go to an Encore Rehabilitation services center, there are still plenty of options available to you. Whether you decide to arrange for a therapist to visit you at your home, workplace, or school, or you choose to seek care in a hospital, Encore works with its patients to ensure that they receive timely and reliable care.

Advantage #3: WorkZone Industrial Rehab

One of the things that truly sets Encore apart from other facilities is its focus on workplace rehabilitation. The WorkZone Industrial Rehab program works with companies to create a safe and productive environment in which employees can thrive. Since so many of the injuries treated by their professionals are job related, the facility recognizes the benefit of preventing problems before they happen. You can even request that Encore visit your business to analyze workplace safety regulations and help improve working conditions for everyone. In addition to working with employers to implement policies that prevent injury, Encore also works with you and other employees to encourage healthy lifestyle choices that can stave off the effects of illness and injury. Preventative care is essential to taking care of your body and saving yourself pain and effort in the long run.

Advantage #4: Sports Medicine Expertise

Many injuries are the result of athletic activities and can be very different from those caused by routine ailments and movement. Encore Rehabilitation recognizes that sports injuries require expert knowledge and specific treatment, and the facility takes a holistic approach to managing recovery through sports therapy. Many injured athletes choose Encore when they want a facility that will focus on getting them back into condition to resume the sports they love. While hospitals frequently treat injuries, there is considerable benefit to working with individuals who understand the difference between routine injuries and sports injuries. Torn rotator cuffs, swollen joints, and ACL issues are frequently associated with sports injuries and require the specialized care and technology that Encore provides to get you back to your full athletic potential.

Advantage #5: Personalized Care

Although Encore is a large company, it operates like a series of small businesses. With numerous locations sprinkled throughout Alabama and Mississippi, Encore is able to keep the ratio of patients-to-providers low. You will receive personalized attention from your assigned healthcare professionals in an environment that has all the benefits of a major company and all the charm and attention of a small business. Healthcare can often feel like an impersonal experience in which you are just another statistic, but the Encore experience is refreshingly different. Your case will be managed by thoughtful professionals who genuinely care about your progress and want to help you reach your full potential. Support is an essential component of the rehabilitation process, and the first step in building a strong support network is working with caring healthcare providers.

Advantage #6: Treatment Length Options

Whether you are looking for long-term treatment or a quick and easy rehabilitation experience to help you get back on your feet, Encore has a variety of options to offer. You can choose between inpatient and outpatient care depending on your needs. If you can take time off from school or work, you may benefit from the extended treatment offered by Encore’s inpatient programs. This allows you to receive care around the clock without interruption, facilitating a fast recovery. On the other hand, if your commitments make it impossible to get away for an extended period of time, Encore will work with you to fit appointments into your busy schedule.

Disadvantage: Limited Locations

In spite of its many advantages, there is one major disadvantage to Encore. The company currently only offers facilities in Alabama and Mississippi. However, due to the superior quality of Encore’s services and the professional excellence of its staff members, many patients choose to make the trip and receive care at one of Encore’s many inpatient facilities. Others travel to an Encore facility and receive outpatient care while staying in the area. Your Encore team will work with you to develop a plan that meets your needs and makes travel as smooth as possible. Encore is able to provide personalized care to each of its patients to develop a treatment program that works with every aspect of their life.

To find a location near you, visit the  locations page on our website!

 

I’m from Portland and write about physical rehabiliation for GuideDoc.com